What would you like to see on Esmeralda’s? Survey Time!

Esmeralda’s Cumbrian History & Folklore has been running since October 2010, since when I’ve written over a hundred posts. I write about whatever pops into my mind on the day I sit in front of the computer, so it’s been a wild and varied list of subjects taking in everything from serious, little-known Cumbrian history to boggles and faeries to fabulous Cumbrian objects buried in the vaults of The British Museum.

There have been times when posts haven’t quite worked. There’s been just one instance when I took

one down because I attracted a few very well-informed visitors who very kindly and subtly helped me to conclude that I was, well, completely wrong (which taught me to look harder at my sources – this particular idea had been running around since the ’70s and it was, when I think about it, a bit bonkers). There was another that came down because it features a picture, plus caption, of a Cumbrian currant slice (you may know it as fly pie). This post was ostensibly a bit of mid-20th century nostalgia, but actually – if you carve a box in my chest and take a look – about the passing of my mother. This post attracted thousands of enquiries… about the recipe for currant slice!  Who knew there was such an unfulfilled demand for local recipes?

My favourite posts, to research, write and discuss, fall into two diverse camps. Firstly, the really old history that no-one here really seems to know. Often people know the folklore versions, and get tangled up with Arthur and slightly mad traditions, but we do have some facts. They’re just well hidden. The other group I really enjoy is those with a mist of another world about them; all those inscriptions to faceless gods and place-names hinting at lost folklore. All in all, I like to look for what has been lost, one way or another.

How people read and inter-act with blogs has changed massively in those three years. People often comment on the Facebook or Twitter links to these posts rather than on the blog – is this because we feel more confident that our comment will be seen there, or is it because of the different levels of public visibility? The spam still comes in – 21,000 comments and counting. Mostly about cheap money (huh!) and cheap branded boots (um) and once, famously, cheap yachts.

Anyway, would you tick a few boxes on this survey for me? I’m looking for guidance on the next 100 blog posts. Tick all you like. All answers are anonymous.

Thank you 😀

 

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14 thoughts on “What would you like to see on Esmeralda’s? Survey Time!

  1. The poll is only letting you select one option I’m afraid

    i was trying to vote for
    Gods and goddesses of Cumbria
    Celtic history and folklore in Cumbria
    Myths and legends of Cumbria
    at least, but hey, just keep writing – all of it is fascinating

  2. sorry – as you were

    the system is that you vote for one option then go back to the poll and vote for another & another – vote early vote often

    And I agree with your comment on comments – I get very few comments actually on my blog, other than the usual spam. As you say a lot more goes on elsewhere, which I think is a shame sometimes, since the blog comments area would form a good central record of sometimes interesting discussions that can follow a post – rather than letting the discussion become scattered and fragmented.

    But still, we can only put the information out there, people will react using their preferred method

    • Oh, is it? Darn. This is my first attempt at the poll that sorts itself out and embeds itself in WordPress!

      I think everyone says that blog comments end up on the place where you advertised the blog, rather than on the blog itself these days. It is a bit strange. I know some people get put off by captchas, identity verification and comment vetting and so on, but they’re not on all blogs (and indeed not on this one).

      Thanks very much for your vote(s) and your comments 🙂

    • Hi Michelle – are we not already FB friends? I certainly get your blog feed there. There’s also an FB page on Cumbrian History and indeed another one on Cumbrian Folklore (which is generally less active but it depends who’s around to post stuff). I love your posts – no one else does what you do 🙂

  3. I agree the voting on the provider used only allows one vote, it doesn’t give you the range you need.
    Keep up the good work Diane on Esmeralda and keep that Book in your mind…..

    • Hi Tom, yes it looks like you have to ‘tick’ one then press ‘vote’ then repeat if you want to tick more boxes. I might import a poll monkey version if I do a survey again – they do let you tick more than one at once. Thank you for your vote(s), though!

  4. Okey-doke, so here’s the scoop. I enjoy a lot of what you post so “I don’t mind. Just tell me a story.” probably fits best. BUT if I had to choose anything else I would very much enjoy any of the following choices as well:

    Crypti-zoology
    Tudors, Stuarts, Georgians and Victorians in Cumbria
    More heroes, knights, battles and skirmishes

    Thanks for continuing to share so much information with us, Diane!

  5. Greetings from abroad!…I just added my vote to your poll! It would be nice if you can consider the chance to create a new label for “Cumbrian Ballads”… I am sure there might be some remnant of these and not collected by scholars like Child!… keep up the sacred scottish flame as always!…Blessed be! )o(

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